University of Wisconsin’s Nutrient and Pest Management Senior Outreach Specialist Jamie Patton displays how the moldboard plow leaves the soil clumpy rather than crumbly.
University of Wisconsin’s Nutrient and Pest Management Senior Outreach Specialist Jamie Patton displays how the moldboard plow leaves the soil clumpy rather than crumbly.

   One pound of phosphorus runoff can fuel up to 500 pounds of algae growth in a body of water.

   Due to a high concentration of phosphorous, Big Green Lake has been listed by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources as an impaired body of water since 2014.

   The Land and Lake Family Field Day last week Saturday explored the connections between soil health and runoff while showcasing local farmers’ conservation efforts.

   The Green Lake Association and the Wisconsin Farm Bureau sponsored the event at Dukelow Farm, where they kicked off the event with a farm panel, in which farmers discussed conservation practices they use.

   After the panel, University of Wisconsin’s Nutrient and Pest Management Senior Outreach Specialist Jamie Patton gave a field demonstration, outlining how technological advancements have made conservation practices easier.

   Read the full story,  including why some farmers decided to change their methods, in the Aug. 22, 2019 edition of the Ripon Commonwealth Press.