Max Hartman, left, and Jack Taylor race to keep a woven ball in the air as part of a hacky sack-like game led by their peers from Thailand. A sport known as “sepak takraw,” similar to volleyball, involves this type of rattan ball and rules of play (keeping the ball aloft without the use of hands or arms). The game is popular in Thailand and other parts of Southeast Asia.
Max Hartman, left, and Jack Taylor race to keep a woven ball in the air as part of a hacky sack-like game led by their peers from Thailand. A sport known as “sepak takraw,” similar to volleyball, involves this type of rattan ball and rules of play (keeping the ball aloft without the use of hands or arms). The game is popular in Thailand and other parts of Southeast Asia.

   Green Lake weather warmed up just in time to greet students from a more tropical corner of the globe.

   Students from Thailand arrived in Green Lake at the end of April, staying through today (Wednesday).

   Green Lake schoolchildren got a taste of the Southeast Asian culture when the travelers held a presentation and demonstration in the school gym last week Friday.

   The Thai visitors wore traditional garments, danced and quizzed the Green Lakers’ knowledge of Thailand, handing out prizes for correct answers.

  They then transliterated the American kids’ names into the Thai alphabet, played a version of hacky sack with a woven ball and showed them how to count out baht, Thailand’s currency, in bills and coins.

   See more photos of the Thai visitors' presentation in the May 10, 2018 edition of the Ripon Commonwealth Press.