SARAH KRAAZ OF Ripon holds up a copy of her new book, “Music and War in the United States.” 	   Ian Stepleton photo
SARAH KRAAZ OF Ripon holds up a copy of her new book, “Music and War in the United States.” Ian Stepleton photo

     YOU RECOGNIZE THE bold opening bars of Credence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son” immediately as it comes on the radio.

     It’s refrain? Hard to forget:

     “It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no senator’s son,/It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no fortunate one.”

     The words spoke to the anger some felt during a war in which so many young men were drafted, never to return home.

     It’s easy to see how popular music intersected with the Vietnam War.

     But this wasn’t a new concept.

     Whether a rallying cry to battle or a ballad lamenting the loss of a child, music and war have been tied together for all of recorded history.

     No one understands this better than Ripon’s Sarah Kraaz — who recently released her first book, “Music and War in the United States.”

     As editor of the tome, Kraaz brought together experts in the field to speak toward how music influenced America in every major conflict in which it’s engaged.

     “It’s music in the military and music among the civilian population for each conflict,” she said. ...

     To read the entire column, see the May 16, 2019 edition of The Ripon Commonwealth Press.