FORMER REP. CLAUDINE Schneider, a Republican: “I maintain that the people who call themselves Republican at this moment in time who happen to serve in the U.S. Congress are not real Republicans, because they cannot represent fiscal responsibility.” 		  Tim Lyke photo
FORMER REP. CLAUDINE Schneider, a Republican: “I maintain that the people who call themselves Republican at this moment in time who happen to serve in the U.S. Congress are not real Republicans, because they cannot represent fiscal responsibility.” Tim Lyke photo

     “I was pleased to learn that you’ll be going to Ripon, where the Republican Party was born. Tell your audiences that we are trying to recapture the spirit and the soul of the Republican Party, and its commitment to unity, freedom and equal opportunity, and to free people and free markets. Our message is that the Republican Party is not the ethno-racist, tribal personality cult that it has become under Trump, and hopefully we can bring it back to the spirit of Ripon and Abraham Lincoln.”
—  note sent to former Rep. Claudine Schneider from a co-founder of the Ripon Society upon his learning of her upcoming visit to the Wisconsin city for which the centrist, Republican Party public-policy organization was named.

     A former congresswoman recently reminded Ripon and Green Lake residents that the issue of global warming, while political, is not uniformly partisan.

     A day after viewing Freeland Film Festival documentaries and participating in panel discussions in Green Lake, former Rhode Island Rep. Claudine Schneider visited Ripon College to discuss how man-made climate change may be slowed.

     The registered Republican authored the 1988 Global Warming Prevention Act, which drew 140 co-sponsors from both parties and, while it did not pass, opened the nation’s eyes to the risks of doing nothing to mitigate change in the face of heightened greenhouse-gas emissions.  

     The day before Green Lake’s film festival began, the New York Times published an analysis, based on research from Harvard and Columbia law schools as well as other sources, that listed more than 80 environmental rules and regulations on the way out under the Trump administration.

     Two days after Schneider’s talk at Ripon College, the White House announced it would oppose California’s auto-emission standards, which are lower than the federal government’s.  

     Emotion conveyed in Schneider’s plea for public-policy sanity — “My heart is weeping,” she said — didn’t overshadow tips for practical, non-governmental measures people can take to show greater respect for the planet. ...

     On a more macro scale, Schneider urged Freeland and Ripon College attendees to do all they can to affect regime change at the highest levels. “I maintain that the people who call themselves Republican at this moment in time who happen to serve in the U.S. Congress are not real Republicans, because they cannot represent fiscal responsibility,” she said. ...          

— Tim Lyke