The Confederate flag is a reminder for some of a time when many people were viewed as less than human.
The Confederate flag is a reminder for some of a time when many people were viewed as less than human.

     For four of the past six weeks the Commonwealth has published letters to the editor concerning the wisdom of flying the Confederate flag.

     The letters began with the Rev. Jim Mohr, former pastor for almost 20 years at Our Saviour’s United Church of Christ, expressing disappointment at seeing a replica of a Confederate battle flag hanging in front of a Ripon home.

     “In my mind displaying this flag is a slap in the face of the 12,000 soldiers from Wisconsin who died fighting against it during the Civil War as well as a symbol of racism, whether explicit or implicit, in 21st century Wisconsin,” Mohr wrote.

     This led to letters responding to Mohr’s indictment, written by northerners who have spent some time living in the South. They explained that the

     Confederate flag represents the pride people share of their region and its ancestral heritage.

     No offense intended, they say, ignoring the proverb, “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.”

     This is no snowflake response to political incorrectness and it sure isn’t a demand for censorship, which is a slippery slope toward authoritarian fakery.  

     It’s a call to decency. ...
            
                                     — Tim Lyke

     To read the entire editorial, see the Oct. 3, 2019 edition of The Ripon Commonwealth Press.