REP. GLENN GROTHMAN, R-Glenbeulah, speaks in April 2017 at a Ripon Chamber-sponsored event at the Little White Schoolhouse.                         			    Maic D’Agostino photo
REP. GLENN GROTHMAN, R-Glenbeulah, speaks in April 2017 at a Ripon Chamber-sponsored event at the Little White Schoolhouse. Maic D’Agostino photo

     Ripon’s congressman weighed in on the #metoo movement last week on a Milwaukee radio show.

     Rep. Glenn Grothman, R-Glenbeulah, seemed to suggest that allegations of sexual assault can be a nuisance.

     Ouch.  

     While briefly discussing the Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination Sept. 19 with WTMJ’s Steve Scafiddi, Grothman described as “scary” the notion that the nomination might be delayed because a woman alleged that the nominee had attempted to sexually assault her decades ago when both were teens.

     This is what Grothman told Scafiddi about the Kavanaugh matter:

     “It shows kind of where America is going and where some people are going. If you would say that someone — any situation, any nomination — that they can say that something happened over 30 years ago — ‘I can’t remember where it happened, I can’t remember who drove me there, but I think we have to delay this confirmation until we determine this’ — I mean by those standards, and somebody who quite frankly we believe is a liberal otherwise, is there anything that can ever get done? So it’s kind of scary where things have gone and scary that people feel that this is a reason that maybe we have to sit and wait here for a couple months.”

     That last part is hyperbole.

     Given the facts as Grothman knows them today and knew them a week ago, no one seriously has suggested that Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote might be delayed for a couple months. The FBI took three days in September 1991 to investigate Anita Hill’s sexual harassment allegations against Supreme Court Justice nominee Clarence Thomas.

     If the Kavanaugh confirmation vote has to be delayed by another three days, or three weeks, so be it. A justice is appointed for life, so it’s critical that the finest legal scholars of relatively unblemished character be appointed to make decisions about the constitutionality of laws that affect the lives of those to whom they will be accountable only in history.

     Kavanaugh, who has a distinguished career and an impeccable resume, may be that very justice.

     But those who rush to judgement in declaring his innocence or embracing Christine Blader Ford’s accusation say more about themselves than they do about the people they attempt to defend. ...
                                      — Tim Lyke

     To read the entire editorial, see the Sept. 27, 2018 edition of The Ripon Commonwealth Press.